So I have an idea for a play. My issue is that I have characters and a setting, but not a story. No narrative anywhere. This idea is like the Occupy Wall Street movement, which is ironic, given that the setting is Occupy Wall Street… However, people generally don’t want to sit for endless hours in a theater waiting for a story to occur.

Religion, public media and social media

Bear with me as I’m in a state of half-delierium and half clarity.  In working through a proposal to a major government agency for my employer, I have realized part of the reason why public media is by and large failing online.  And I mean spectacularly failing at least in comparison to its broadcast audiences.  Even you NPR.  I think I’m channeling Michael Rosenblum.

The reason is we are trying to be a religion that attracts people through building the best churches you can imagine.  Churches (or temples or mosques) with a lot of high production value, snazz, zing, pretty Ken Burns pictures, rich audio, yadda yadda. This was semi-workable when media productions were all incredibly expensive to create but the Internet changed the economy of media creation.  Now, some people will come to the faith because of the pretty building, but today major religions rely on modern missionaries, who focus on connecting with millions of people, one community at a time around the globe, and working with them, listening to them, to make their religion relevant for them (I’m blissfully ignoring the forced conversions that missionaries inflicted on many many people for millenia).  Not so much on building the big church with the naves and the stained glass windows.  Building online communities in public media means that the organizations need to act like missionaries and less like temple builders.  At least then you’ll get people in the door.  Now, whether you’ll get a revenue stream is another issue.

Amen.

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Holy cow.  I wonder if the businessman’s name  in question begins with Rupert…

This may be the great white hope for public radio (not audio).  If media must insinuate itself into our streams, then really, radio is about the only medium that can safely insinuate itself into our driving/commuting “streams.”  Radio does that already.

Muppets and Bohemian Rhapsody.  Need I say more?

My work life until November 19 

(Note, I’m not in the theater business, but this is how I feel).

Philip Henslowe: Mr. Fennyman, allow me to explain about the theatre business. The natural condition is one of insurmountable obstacles on the road to imminent disaster.
Hugh Fennyman: So what do we do?
Philip Henslowe: Nothing. Strangely enough, it all turns out well.
Hugh Fennyman: How?
Philip Henslowe: I don’t know. It’s a mystery.

Apparently the “universal health care kills freedom” meme is picking up steam.

So perhaps more of us should be free to declare bankruptcy due to skyrocketing health care costs?  Free to pay higher premiums for even less benefits each year?  Free to see only certain doctors when our HMO says so?

Exactly.  I have a friend in the Tea Party movement and I think they need to figure out whether they want to stand (or fall) on principle, at all costs, or learn that policy is the art of compromise and inclusion.

"Big newspapers, big magazines, big radio and TV… these are industrial age creatures. Some will persist in the new age that is coming upon us. But they will need to adapt to the new networked environment, where everybody can contribute."